Browse by Tags

The Lemming Defense

Federal law requires employers to pay overtime wages when an employee works more than 40 hours a week. Should the rule apply to workers in the horse business? ...

Finding Fault

Falling off a horse is an inherent risk of riding and does not always mean that someone, somewhere, was negligent....

Across the Pond

The Animals Act is England's national equivalent to state equine activity laws in the United States. The idea is to make horse owners liable for equine-related personal injuries in some--but not all--situations....

Inherent Risks

State equine activity liability laws reduce personal injury lawsuit numbers by legislatively mandating the assumption of many risks by participants. But do the statutes provide too much protection for farm owners and competition sponsors?...

Politically Incorrect

New York Racing Association stewards denied a request to dye Hansen's tail blue for the Gotham Stakes at Aqueduct. Is racing too stodgy for its own good?...

Filed under:

Sentimental Journey, Part 2

Allowing an owner to recover damages for the sentimental value of an animal harmed by someone's negligence is the first step down a slippery slope leading to reduced access to affordable veterinary care, according to opponents of non-economic awards. ...

Filed under:

When Foals Attack

Can "normal" behavior by a foal be the basis for a successful personal injury lawsuit? An appellate court in New York said "no." ...

Filed under:

A Whale Tale

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals argues that whales in captivity are slaves under the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. If they're right, where does that leave horses and other animals? ...

Filed under:

We’re Back!

Horses and the Law is back with a new emphasis on opinion and commentary regarding legal issues affecting the equine community....

Filed under:

An Honest Mistake

Marble Cliff's victories and earnings were forfeited when it was discovered that his certification as an Ohio-foaled Thoroughbred was an error. Ironically, a court ruled that the horse was worth less as a Kentucky-bred than as an Ohio-bred. ...

Filed under:

About This Blog

Equine lawyers don’t sue horses—but what, exactly, do they do? And why does it matter? Horses and the Law brings you an in-depth look at the important legal issues affecting horse owners and exhibitors today, including liability, sales and bloodstock agents, contracts and other business concerns, taxes, the animal rights vs. animal welfare debate, and legislation. If you agree with something, or even if you don’t, feel free to comment. Just keep it tasteful. And remember that Horses and the Law does not—and cannot—address your specific legal problems, and is not a source of legal advice. For that, you should contact your own attorney.