By now we’ve all become acquainted with 2013 and its possibilities. (Despite the fact we’re a week in, though, I’m still creatively converting twos to threes when I write the date.)

To me January feels a bit like a brand new barn coat, fitting snug and warm and not yet completely coated with hay dust and smeared with horse snot (and banned to the stable-only rack by the door). Decisions to eat healthy remain mostly intact. Winter is relatively fresh and I’m not muttering at it or about it yet. Daylight hours are building. Organizational projects at home are well under way.

All that said, I didn’t set any resolutions this year.

Ever since I resolved twice to learn to do a flip turn in the swimming pool and felt the ridiculous shame of never actually mastering it, resolutions have lost their sparkle a bit. I have found I haven’t taken them as seriously. But this doesn’t keep me from identifying things I want to pursue intentionally during the year. From places I hope to see and things I hope to write, to horses I hope to ride (Gandalf) and centuries (100-mile rides on my bike) I hope to complete, there’s a lot of hope for 2013, and that’s enough for me to focus on without setting a resolution list.

Speaking of intentionality, yesterday I received a letter from a faithful reader in Canada who is very purposeful about caring for her horses. In her own words, she “pays attention to every little detail of my horses’ lives.” She asked about some of their daily/hourly outer signs of health. She knows these horses better than anyone and wants the very best for them.

Something that touched me about her letter was that she is not only a TheHorse.com user but also an avid magazine subscriber.

Be sure to check out the January 2013 issue of The Horse.  

Cover Photo: Carien Schippers

She requested we pursue an article about a curious, but very useful subject. (Poop! Yes. Really.) It just so happens we’ll have an article on this subject in the upcoming March issue of The Horse: Your Guide To Equine Health Care.

That reminded me: If you aren’t getting our magazine, I really think you’re missing out. There’s premium content there that won’t appear on the website for quite a while, and you should take a look! Here are some highlights from our current issue (January), which you can purchase as a single copy:

  • Smart NSAID Use: Most of us have non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) around the barn and we’ve used them for years. That familiarity might make us feel like we know exactly when/how to apply these, but it’s really important to talk to our vet before giving them. Giving them could cause more problems than it helps.
  • While You’re Away: Even though I’ve been farm sitting for all of my adult life, I still found the take-homes from this article incredibly useful. Most involve setting expectations and making careful preparations. This is another must-read piece, whether you keep your horses at home or at a boarding barn.
  • Feeding Orphan Foals/Shaping Orphan Behavior: A surprising number of questions about orphan foals come across our desks, and our writers and editors looked at this issue from both a nutritional and a behavior standpoint. For anyone in the breeding business or who might find themselves with an orphan on their hands, this material is crucial.

So, if you aren’t already a magazine subscriber those are three reasons why you should get a copy of the January issue or subscribe. If you prefer to consume magazines digitally, we also have a digital edition subuscription.

How did you find out about TheHorse.com? Are you familiar with our print magazine? If you aren’t, will you give it a try?